Products Data Briefs Number 448 November 2022

Alcohol use disorder, which includes alcohol dependence, is defined in the WHO’s International Classification of Diseases (available here). Alcohol use disorder (AUD) refers to the drinking of alcohol that causes mental and physical health problems. Globally, the age-standardized death rate has declined from approximately 40 deaths per 100,000 people in the early 1990s to 30 deaths per 100,000 in 2019. Both are measured in terms of pure alcohol/ethanol intake rather than the total quantity of the beverage. Wine contains around 12% pure alcohol per volume, so that one liter of wine contains 0.12 liters of pure alcohol. Beer contains around 5% of pure alcohol per volume1 so that one liter of beer contains 0.05 liters of pure alcohol.

Kentucky is a statistical anomaly with a low rate of underage drinking deaths and a low rate of chronic causes. Death from excessive alcohol use is on the rise in Colorado, catching up to national averages, and the rate of binge drinkers is high. California sees the nation’s https://ecosoberhouse.com/article/alcoholism-statistics-you-need-to-know/ highest number of alcohol-related deaths but has a low rate of underage drinking. Arizona has a high number of alcohol-related deaths compared to its population. † Largest number of drinks consumed on an occasion in the past 30 days among adults who reported binge drinking.

Deaths from alcohol use disorders

The breakdown of alcohol use disorders by gender for any country can be viewed here; the majority of people with alcohol use disorders – around three-quarters – are male. It’s estimated that globally, around 1 percent of the population has an alcohol use disorder. At the country level, as shown in the chart, this ranges from around 0.5 to 5 percent of the population. This chart is shown for the global total but can be explored for any country or region using the « Change country or region » toggle.

Deaths from causes fully attributable to alcohol use have increased during the past 2 decades in the United States, particularly from 2019 to 2020, concurrent with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, previous studies of trends have not assessed underlying causes of deaths that are partially attributable to alcohol use, such as injuries or certain types of cancer. Average annual number of deaths from excessive alcohol use increased 29.3%, from 137,927 during 2016–2017 to 178,307 during 2020–2021; age-standardized alcohol-related death rates increased from 38.1 to 47.6 per 100,000 population.

Alcohol Consumption

Alcohol killed a record number of people in 2022 as heavier drinking in the Covid pandemic took its toll in the UK, official figures have revealed. Percentage change in per capita ethanol consumption, https://ecosoberhouse.com/ United States, 1977–2021. At the end of this topic page, we provide a number of potential sources of support and guidance for those concerned about uncontrolled drinking or alcohol dependency.

  • In the chart, we see estimates of the alcohol-attributable fraction (AAF), which is the proportion of deaths that are caused or exacerbated by alcohol (i.e., that proportion that would disappear if alcohol consumption was removed).
  • This surveillance report on apparent per capita alcohol consumption in the United States is the 37th in a series of reports that examine alcohol consumption trends on a national, State, and regional basis.
  • Statistics on mortality are derived from the information provided when deaths are certified and registered.
  • This is of particular concern when you’re taking certain medications that also depress the brain’s function.

Questions or messages regarding errors in formatting should be addressed to MMWR and Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report are service marks of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.Use of trade names and commercial sources is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. References to non-CDC sites on the Internet are provided as a service to MMWR readers and do not constitute or imply endorsement of these organizations or their programs by CDC or the U.S. All authors have completed and submitted the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors form for disclosure of potential conflicts of interest.

Impact on your health

Among both males and females, alcohol-attributable death rates increased for most cause of death categories. The average number of sex-specific alcohol-attributable deaths increased among all age groups from 2016–2017 to 2020–2021(Figure). From 2016–2017 to 2020–2021, the average annual number of U.S. deaths from excessive alcohol use increased by more than 40,000 (29%), from approximately 138,000 per year (2016–2017) to 178,000 per year (2020–2021). This increase translates to an average of approximately 488 deaths each day from excessive drinking during 2020–2021.

Young Adults in U.S. Drinking Less Than in Prior Decades – Gallup.com

Young Adults in U.S. Drinking Less Than in Prior Decades.

Posted: Tue, 22 Aug 2023 07:00:00 GMT [source]

The harmful use of alcohol can also result in harm to other people, such as family members, friends, co-workers and strangers.

Implications for Public Health Practice

Because some persons who formerly drank alcohol might also die from alcohol-related causes, population-attributable fractions might underestimate alcohol-attributable deaths. Alcohol-attributable deaths, also known as alcohol-related deaths, include deaths from any cause that can be attributed to alcohol. This includes alcohol-specific causes (those that can only be caused by alcohol), such as alcoholic liver disease.

  • Because some persons who formerly drank alcohol might also die from alcohol-related causes, population-attributable fractions might underestimate alcohol-attributable deaths.
  • This pattern of drinking is often termed ‘binging,’ where individuals consume large amounts of alcohol within a single session versus small quantities more frequently.
  • During this time, deaths from excessive alcohol use among males increased 26.8%, from 94,362 per year to 119,606, and among females increased 34.7%, from 43,565 per year to 58,701.
  • These factors are discussed in detail in the AEDS data reference manual on per capita alcohol consumption (Nephew et al. 2004).
  • Total alcohol per capita consumption in 2016 among male and female drinkers worldwide was on average 19.4 litres of pure alcohol for males and 7.0 litres for females.

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